Teaching students with visual impairments: Empathy and facilitation

Welcome back to the Inclusive Piano Teaching blog. Today's entry is part two of a discussion on teaching students with visual impairments. I would like talk briefly about some things to think about when bringing a student into the piano studio. Some of these things may sound redundant, but can have a substantive impact on the educational experience...

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Recital preparation and performance

'Tis the season for recitals. To prepare our studios for the recital, it is common to pick the date and venue, decide on the type of recital (duet, theme, holiday), plan the reception, and pick repertoire for our students. Many of these same things occur when preparing for a recital with our students with special needs; however, there are also othe...

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Studio environment: Some keys to success

Studio environment can play an important role in the success of our students with special needs. We don't tend to think of the studio as being more than a tool in the lesson, but the actual environment and the objects present can sometimes be the deciding factors in the success or failure of a lesson. Maintaining a special-needs-friendly environmen...

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When our students walk into our studios for lessons, we often ask them how was their week, are they doing anything fun this week, or ask about something they told as at their previous lesson. Regardless of who the student is or what he or she told us, that person is a student or a child. The same type of thinking refers to our students with disabil...

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Person-first language

When our students walk into our studios for lessons, we often ask them how was their week, are they doing anything fun this week, or ask about something they told as at their previous lesson. Regardless of who the student is or what he or she told us, that person is a student or a child. The same type of thinking refers to our students with disabil...

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Meet the authors of the Inclusive Piano Teaching Blog, Part III

Dr. Melissa Martiros Melissa Martiros currently holds the position of Assistant Professor and Program Coordinator of Music at Martin Methodist College in Pulaski, TN where she is also serves as the Director of the CWN Community Arts Academy, a pre-college program she founded in 2015. Prior to her appointment at Martin Methodist College, she served ...

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Meet the authors of the Inclusive Piano Teaching Blog, Part II

Dr. Beth A. Bauer received her doctorate of music education from the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music. Her dissertation is titled "What is an appropriate approach to piano instruction for students with Down syndrome?" Additional degree work includes a Master of Music from Northern Illinois University where she studied with Bill Koehler, an...

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Meet the authors of the Inclusive Piano Teaching Blog, Part I

 The next three postings will introduce you to the three authors who will be sharing their expertise. First up, Dr. Scott Price from the University of South Carolina. Dr. Scott Price is the founder and instructor of the Carolina LifeSong Initiative that is dedicated to providing piano lesson and music experiences (including improvisation and m...

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Welcome to the Inclusive Piano Teaching Blog!

Welcome to the Inclusive Piano Teaching Blog sponsored by The Frances Clark Center for Keyboard Pedagogy. We hope you will join us in the coming months as we share information on teaching learners of all abilities. Check back often for new content! What is the blog? The Inclusive Piano Teaching blog is designed to bring you in-depth and practical i...

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More than a lesson: Piano study and students with special needs

Students with special needs face unique challenges every day, and those challenges may become pronounced in the intense interpersonal environment of the piano lesson. Many of these students face challenges in learning and processing social behaviors and expressing themselves in forms of social communication. These students often require a learning ...

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Adaptive Approaches to Piano Study

Adaptive Approaches to Piano Study

Early in my piano education, I realized that sometimes I would need to play with my hands crossed. After I announced to my parents that I wanted to take piano lessons, my grandmother kindly gave me the old upright that she didn't play anymore. My father played for me the only piece he knew—a circus sort of tune with the melody in the left hand and ...

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The Cincinnati Adaptive Music Camp

The Cincinnati Adaptive Music Camp (CAMC) was born out of a dream that violin teacher Jennifer Petry had to expand her teaching experience with her own children to other children with physical disabilities. Both Jennifer and I adopted children with limb differences. Jennifer's daughters have no arms, and my daughters have several physical differenc...

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How do you teach students with AD/HD?

Have you ever had a student who just couldn't sit still and listen? Have you ever had a student who couldn't focus on what you were saying for more than a few seconds? Have you ever had a student who got frustrated easily? Are these rhetorical questions? Of course they are! Anyone who has taught for several years has perhaps dreaded the sight ...

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How do you teach students who learn at a slower pace? Part I

from the series: Issues and Ideas: Perspectives in Pedagogy Rebecca Johnson, Editor Over the years, I have received requests to teach students with various disabilities. I have always refused because I felt ignorant and ill-equipped to work with children who have these kinds of challenges. However, about a year ago I accepted into my studio a ...

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Piano Magazine is the leading resource for pianists, piano teachers, and piano enthusiasts. We bring you informative, interesting, and inspiring ideas on all aspects of piano teaching, learning, and performing. The official name of Clavier Companion magazine was changed to Piano Magazine in 2019.

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