Questions and Answers: Dotted Quarter Eighth Note Rhythm

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Daniel Tsukamoto
Will there ever be online transmission, where I don't have to worry about 1/8 of a second delay while doing demonstration to my st... Read More
Sunday, 23 February 2020 20:48
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Dot spots

Add improvised pizzazz to the easy rhythms found in beginner tunes by asking your students to identify "dot spots." These are places where students can substitute dotted rhythms in place of quarter notes. Instead of this: Students play this: Listen and play It's not necessary for students to know how to read dotted rhythms prior to exploring their ...
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How do you teach the dotted-quarter eighth note rhythm?

In this issue, we address the teaching of a basic, but often challenging, skill—the dotted-quarter eighth note rhythm. We wanted to take a different approach and survey several teachers to assemble a wider collection of ideas for you, the reader, to consider.  Nine teachers of pre-college students submitted their thoughts on teaching this rhyt...
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How do you teach dotted rhythms?

Although the steady pulse is fundamental to the concept of rhythm, the lilt and forward movement of rhythm is created through the variety of note values. Dotted rhythms are vital to our rhythmic experience. Folk tunes, patriotic songs, hymns, and Christmas carols are replete with dotted rhythms because of the life they give to the rhythmic flow. Th...
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How Do You Encourage a Student's Involvement in the Movement of Music?

Movement in music occurs on many levels. It can be felt in one's body as a conscious - or unconscious - physical response to a vibrant march, a soothing lullaby, or some other sort of music. It can be studied through a consideration of issues related to pulse, rhythm, phrase structure, phrase shape, and musical form. And, in teaching, physical move...
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