RENEW NOW  to lock in 2021 subscription rates for 2022!

Current rates valid through January 31, 2022. New rates begin February 1, 2022.
Click here for information.
Click here to subscribe or renew now!

(If you do not see a RENEW button, please select a plan
and enter any code you may have received in a renewal notice online or in print.)
If you have ANY questions at all, please contact support@claviercompanion.com
1 minute reading time (148 words)

Comping 103—Waltz-time broken chords

Here's a riddle: What do you break to fix? Answer: bland blocked chords.

​Whether improvising teacher accompaniments or helping students dress up ho-hum arrangements, broken chords are a very useful trick to have in your bag. Broken chords sound great with lyrical, long-note melodies that beg for a busier accompaniment. They are also particularly well suited to tunes in 3/4 time because the three notes in triads easily convert to three beats. For example, instead of playing Amazing Grace as written below…

…you or your students could convert the written blocked chords to improvised broken chords.

​As students progress, you can demonstrate how to play extended broken triads.

​Advanced students may enjoy exploring open broken chords.

​Mixing open and closed triads creates wonderfully full accompaniments.

​Next time, we'll look at broken chord patterns in common time. Until then, enjoy your creative music-making journey.

You have to be a member to access this content.

Please login and subscribe to a plan if you have not done so.

"Kamarinskaya” from Tchaikovsky’s Album for the Yo...
Should students count aloud when sight-reading?
 

Comments

Already Registered? Login Here
No comments made yet. Be the first to submit a comment

By accepting you will be accessing a service provided by a third-party external to https://www.ClavierCompanion.com/

About Piano Magazine

Piano Magazine is the leading resource for pianists, piano teachers, and piano enthusiasts. We bring you informative, interesting, and inspiring ideas on all aspects of piano teaching, learning, and performing. The official name of Clavier Companion magazine was changed to Piano Magazine in 2019.

Follow us on

Terms of use

Have Questions?

We are happy to help.

Editorial questions? This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Advertising questions? This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Subscription questions? This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Technical questions? This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Cron Job Starts