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In this issue...The Complete Musician: A Conversation with Robert LevinAndrew Focks joins master keyboard artist Robert Levin for an exclusive interview. Levin performs on the harpsichord, fortepiano, and modern concert grand. He is also a conductor, theorist, musicologist, author, and professor, and his career has taken him all over the world. He is known for improvising embellishments and cadenzas in Classical repertoire. His completions of Mozart fragments are published by Bärenreiter, Breitkopf & Härtel, Carus, Peters, and Wiener Urtext.

In this issue...

The Complete Musician: A Conversation with Robert Levin

Andrew Focks joins master keyboard artist Robert Levin for an exclusive interview. Levin performs on the harpsichord, fortepiano, and modern concert grand. He is also a conductor, theorist, musicologist, author, and professor, and his career has taken him all over the world. He is known for improvising embellishments and cadenzas in Classical repertoire. His completions of Mozart fragments are published by Bärenreiter, Breitkopf & Härtel, Carus, Peters, and Wiener Urtext.
Also in this issue...Tone Production: Doing the Right Things for the Right ReasonsTone production is a very real part of pianism; it’s just that its basis isn’t what many pianists think it is. There is nothing wrong with telling a student to play with more “weight” if a less harsh tone is desired. However, using additional “weight” moderates key (and therefore hammer) acceleration and nothing more. To tell a student that involvement of the arm and wrist achieves an equal dynamic level as involvement of the wrist/hand alone—except “without the harshness”—is nonsense!

Also in this issue...

Tone Production: Doing the Right Things for the Right Reasons

Tone production is a very real part of pianism; it’s just that its basis isn’t what many pianists think it is. There is nothing wrong with telling a student to play with more “weight” if a less harsh tone is desired. However, using additional “weight” moderates key (and therefore hammer) acceleration and nothing more. To tell a student that involvement of the arm and wrist achieves an equal dynamic level as involvement of the wrist/hand alone—except “without the harshness”—is nonsense!
Also in this issue...The Sound of the FutureRather than reject non-piano sounds, learn the advantages of employing all sounds in your teaching. By adding open sound tolerance for orchestral instruments and beyond, investigation, and discovery to our pedagogical arsenal, we can send forth students from our studios as better pianists, better musicians, and excellent listeners.

Also in this issue...

The Sound of the Future

Rather than reject non-piano sounds, learn the advantages of employing all sounds in your teaching. By adding open sound tolerance for orchestral instruments and beyond, investigation, and discovery to our pedagogical arsenal, we can send forth students from our studios as better pianists, better musicians, and excellent listeners.
Also in this issue...Girl Scout Tricks: What music teachers can learn about retention from scoutingGood retention is as important to the Scouts as it is for piano teachers. Teens everywhere are busier than ever, and it’s increasingly difficult to fill the spaces when they drop out. Mary Beth Molenaar discusses how fundamentals of scouting such as student choice, risk-taking, social experiences, and service revitalized her piano studio.

Also in this issue...

Girl Scout Tricks: What music teachers can learn about retention from scouting

Good retention is as important to the Scouts as it is for piano teachers. Teens everywhere are busier than ever, and it’s increasingly difficult to fill the spaces when they drop out. Mary Beth Molenaar discusses how fundamentals of scouting such as student choice, risk-taking, social experiences, and service revitalized her piano studio.
Now for iPad and iPhone...The Clavier Companion appWith the Clavier Companion app, subscribers have full access to all the content of the print magazine, plus enhanced multimedia features complementing selected articles. Receive Clavier Companion the moment it is published, and enjoy access to purchased issues for life! Prices start at just $4.99!

Now for iPad and iPhone...

The Clavier Companion app

With the Clavier Companion app, subscribers have full access to all the content of the print magazine, plus enhanced multimedia features complementing selected articles. Receive Clavier Companion the moment it is published, and enjoy access to purchased issues for life! Prices start at just $4.99!
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